The one important component to survive a life with an invisible illness…

Imagine you are a marathon runner, struggling during the half-way mark.  You are fatigued, suffering from muscle cramps and out of breath.  However, you are determined to complete the marathon and cross the finish line.

So, what spurs you onto the finish the marathon despite the pain and fatigue?  I can imagine that one thought would help is the knowledge that the end is in sight and awareness that the pain and fatigue will eventually end.

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Unlike marathon runners, for those living with chronic illness, there is no end in sight of the pain and fatigue that we endure

Life with an invisible chronic condition, however, is in no way alike to the marathon analogy above.  There is no knowledge that pain, fatigue or other symptoms will end when living with a chronic illness.  There is no finish line when living with an invisible chronic illness.  The question, therefore is if we do not know when the pain, fatigue or other symptoms that torments us will end then what help us get through our lives with a chronic illness?

There is no knowledge that pain or fatigue will end when living with a chronic illness (Click to Tweet)

In my opinion, one crucial component for surviving a life with a chronic illness is hope.

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One important component for surviving a life with a chronic illness is hope (Click to Tweet)

Hope that despite living with debilitating and life-altering symptoms, that we can still lead a ‘normal’ and happy life.

Hope that the symptoms will eventually ease.  Hope that one day there may be even a cure.

For those living with an invisible chronic illness, the hope that they will be believed and taking seriously as many as of you will have experienced, many are disbelieving of any disabilities or conditions because there are no outward signs of there being anything wrong.

The hope that everything will be OK.

Hope is essential for every person, but perhaps it is more necessary for those battling chronic illnesses as it is vital for pulling us out of the deep trenches of pain, hurt and depression that living with an illness can cause.

Hope motivates us to push forward and to keep thriving through even the difficult times.  In my experience, when my symptoms are particularly severe and perhaps am stuck in bed because I am unable to get out due to weakness, it can help therefore to believe that tomorrow will be a better day.  Maintaining hope during hardships can make it slightly less difficult to bear.

Hope is what motivates us to push forward and keep living through the difficult times (Click to Tweet)

Before the diagnosis of a chronic illness, we have hope for the future and the plans we create because the possibilities that are ahead of us are endless.  However, after a diagnosis of a chronic illness, there is suddenly a huge question mark over our futures and the possibilities we envisioned for ourselves.

The future is uncertain.  Due to the uncertainty of the future, faith is therefore decreased.  How do we maintain hope when the life we had known has suddenly changed?  How do we continue to hope when we experience more bad days than good?

Due to the uncertainty of the future, faith is therefore decreased.  How do we maintain hope when the life we had known has suddenly changed?  How do we continue to hope when we experience more bad days than good?

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The truth is that each moment we are in chronic pain or affected by the symptoms associated with our chronic illness, we choose our attitude towards it.  Ergo, we can choose to be negative and resentful towards our situation.  Or we can choose hope and positivity.

For example, I often used to focus on all the ways that my neurological condition limited my life.  Instead of focusing on everything that I am still able to do, I instead focused on the things that I was now unable to do.  This type of cognitive thinking not only can lead to depression and anxiety but can also make you feel inferior to your peers.  Now, I try and focus on everything that I am still able to do, and especially those that give me joy and happiness.  It instils me with hope as well as the reminder that despite the limitations placed upon my life, that I still have things to offer the world.

Everyone reading this who is is living with a chronic illness still has something to offer and has lots that they are still able to do despite there being things that they can no longer to do.

Illness is hard, there is no doubt about it.  From my experience, I know that trying to maintain hope can be extremely difficult as sometimes it can feel that there is nothing to be hopeful for.  But there are things out there that can be healing; things that can make you feel hope still exists even through the darkest of times.

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Simple pleasures every day can help alleviate suffering from pain, nausea or fatigue. These little delights do not have to be expensive or grandiose but can be found in the simplest of things, such as watching a favourite comedy, enjoying a cup of your favourite tea, hugging a pet or listening to a favourite album.  Whatever works for you.

Try writing your favourite things down in a notebook; often when living with illness we can forget, and reminding ourselves of the fun activities we enjoy can help bring joy and hope.

To conclude, hope is just one of the components to be able to survive a life with chronic illness.  Hope is the line between living a happy life despite chronic illness or being consumed by the negativity that illness can create.

Allowing illness to consume our lives, such as focusing on the limitations that it places upon us can, therefore, lead us to lose our identity to our conditions. As the spiritual teacher Eckhart Tolle said: “As long as you make an identity for yourself out of pain, you cannot be free of it.”

By choosing hope, however, we can lead a productive life filled with the pleasures that heal us and brings us joy and free from pain.

By choosing hope we can be productive and enjoy the pleasures that heal us and free us from pain (Click to Tweet)

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9 thoughts on “The one important component to survive a life with an invisible illness…

  1. Excellent post. You state our “case” perfectly and that is there is always hope. Thanks for sharing it in the Chronic Illness Network. Best to you always, Cathy

  2. Reblogged this on Pain Pals and commented:
    Sometimes life can feel like a marathon, but this analogy to a life with chronic illness doesn’t quite work as the pain and fatigue probably won’t disappear over time. But what does keep you going when things get rough? Great post sharing just this…..

  3. Excellent post. I’m so sorry you have to go through this. Hopefully, our scientists will come up with a cure for this and you won’t have to live with it any longer. Sending you prayers and healing vibes.

  4. Realistically no one knows what the future holds, wether living with illness or not. We all just need to focus on making the most of the moment and doing what we can when we can. Forget all the pressure put on us about, you must work so you are making a contribution to society. If you have children you have made a great contribution. Just being yourself is a unique contribution. We all have different things to give/share and we are all good at something, is a fish stupid because it can’t climb a tree?.
    I feel the true goal of life is to treat other beings as you would be treated and be as happy as possible.

  5. Lovely post. I agree that having hope is so important, and it’s what keeps us going through the dark times of chronic illness. Love the quote by Eckart Tolle too. Very thought provoking xx

  6. Not sure how I missed this post – this is wonderful, you have written it so well and it really warmed my heart. You’re right about the simple pleasures too in the small, day to day things ( though admittedly I tend to notice and appreciate these far more after A&E or surgery (before life gets in the way and I stress all of the small stuff & feel I should be doing more). Thank you for sharing!  ♥
    Caz x

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